Creative Child

A Sensory Sensitive Halloween

by Sarah Lyons on Oct 9th, 2017

Continued...

Plan ahead

Try to be flexible and prepare a backup plan, just in case things do not go as planned. My daughter was very excited about Halloween and even wore her costume to school, but when the time came to go trick-or-treating with her siblings, she was overwhelmed. It is okay if your child decides to stay home and hand out candy, needs to take a break during trick-or-treating, or wants to head home early. Parents may also look for alternative activities that are just as fun. Many communities or churches offer fall parties that are not scary, are offered during the day, and where costumes are optional.

Halloween can be fun for everyone if families work together to find a way to celebrate that works for all of them. It is understandable that these traditions do not always sound appealing or make sense to kids that have SPD. Consider coming up with your own Halloween traditions such as painting pumpkins, baking treats, or going to dinner or a movie. With a little extra effort, planning, practice and flexibility, Halloween can be something your whole family enjoys.

Sarah Lyons is a stay at home wife and mother of six children, including 18 month old triplets. Using creative consequences with her kids has improved their behavior and encourages healthy relationships with each other.

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