Creative Child

Craft Ideas: 5+ Crafty Ways to Celebrate President’s Day with Your Kids

by Erin J. Bernard on Feb 13th, 2015

President’s Day is around the corner – George Washington’s birthday – and what better opportunity to explore American history and values with your kids? Below are five plus fun, festive craft ideas and kids activities for celebrating our nation’s presidents.

Make an ‘Honest Abe’ Top Hat. Our 16th president is famous for his towering taste in headwear. Rumor has it he sometimes stored important papers right inside that stovepipe hat! Help your kids make their own Lincoln-style top hats, discuss his achievements, and doff your caps to democracy.

You’ll need:

• A paper plate

• Black markers or black paint/paintbrush

• 2 large pieces of black construction paper

• Glue/tape

• Scissors

Method:

• Color/paint the paper plate black; let dry

• Cut out the plate’s middle, leaving a two-inch “brim”

• Tape/glue the papers together, longest sides touching

• Cut half-inch slits, one inch apart, along the paper’s bottom

• Roll the paper into a cylinder and glue/tape it together

• Fold out the paper’s slits at a 90-degree angle

• Glue the tube, slit-side down, onto the plate. Hat’s off!

(Adapted from “The Civil War Kids 150: Fifty Fun Things to Do, See, Make and Find for the 150th Anniversary”.)

 

President's Breakfast in Bed. You might also like this presidential recipe! Check it out on Pinterest!

Presidential Toast

 

Write a Letter to President Obama. Teach your child about citizen’s rights by helping him or her write a letter to the current president. Younger children may simply want to say “Hello,” while older kids might discuss social issues important to them. Save a copy for a keepsake, then mail your letter to:

The White House

1600 Pennsylvania Avenue NW

Washington, DC, 20500

The president also accepts emails at: president@whitehouse.gov. Letters usually receive a from response.

 

Presidential Cookies anyone? Try creating these amazing cookies from Party Pinching.com

Presidents Day 2015 

Draw a Presidential Portrait. Sitting for a portrait is a longstanding White House tradition. Kids can get in on the fun by creating their own renditions of favorite presidents, complete with fancy frame.

You’ll need:

• Colorful construction paper for a frame

• Plain white paper

• Colored pencils/crayons

• Cotton balls and glue

• Glitter

Method:

• Trace and cut a fancy “frame” from colorful construction paper; decorate with glitter

• Glue the frame onto a white piece of paper

• Draw the portrait, using cotton balls to make hair and beards

For inspiration, visit the Smithsonian’s presidential portrait library: http://www.smithsonianeducation.org/president/gallerymain.aspx.

 

Presidential Guess Who from Cultivated Lives. Try out this fun game as well!

Presidential Guess Who

 

Build a Presidential Parfait. Whip up some patriotism with this red, white, and blue treat. Layer plain yogurt, blueberries, and cherries in a clear cup and serve with pretzels. As kids eat, share the story of young George Washington, who confessed to chopping down a cherry tree because he “could not tell a lie.” Or use the pretzels to build tiny log cabins like the one Abraham Lincoln was born in. (Adapted from www.madincrafts.com.)

 

Make Presidential Coin Rubbings. Familiarize kids with the faces of major presidents by transferring their likenesses onto paper and discussing their achievements.

You’ll need:

• Coins in various denominations

• Thin white paper

• Colored pencils

Method:

• Lay out the coins, “heads” side up. Lay the paper on top.

• Holding the paper steady, color over the coins firmly until the likenesses are fully transferred.

• Hang up your handiwork, or cut out impressions for a mini matching game/math lesson.

 

 

 Presidents Day 2015

Related Article: Firework Stamp Craft

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Erin J. Bernard is a freelance writer, editor, and photographer from Portland, Oregon. Before becoming a writer, Erin worked as a nanny and an ESL classroom teacher. She taught English at a Montessori school in Mexico and then ran an after-school language program in South Korea. Erin is the editor of the parenting guide, “Instructions Not Included: A Pediatrician’s Prescription for Raising the Best Kids on the Block,” written by Irwin H. Berkowitz, MD.

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